Zoe’s Superfood Pistachio “Fudge”

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Pistachio Superfood “Fudge,” ready to enjoy!

I’ve been experimenting with snack foods for my little one.  She is almost 13 months, now.  And, she’s beginning to be picky, all of a sudden.  She’s always up for meat…not so much for veggies.

So, I’ve been exploring ways to be a sneaky chef.  Lately, I’ve been wanting to increase iron, protein, and Vit A, in particular.  I created a pistachio “fudge” that fits the bill.  And, it’s easy to make (you just need a good quality food processor).

If you don’t have one, it’s worth trotting over to your friend’s house and borrowing theirs (you can treat them to some extra fudge as a thank you).

Both my husband and my little one love the fudge (I do, too).  And, I can always give her bits of this fudge when she is resisting other food items.  It’s a great snack, too!

Let’s talk ingredients.

Pistachios are a powerhouse of nutrients and they are gentle on your digestive system.  They are healthy fat high in B1 and B6.

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Pistachio nutrition panel

Then, there’s hemp seeds, a nutrition powerhouse.  Also, with a good bit of B1, hemp seeds also have loads of magnesium and zinc.  There’s a decent amount of iron, as well.

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Hemp hearts nutrition panel

I also used spirulina, a superfood high in all the B vitamins (except B12), iron, carotenoids, and protein (among other things).  A long-time traditional food among the Aztecs, the explorer Cortez in his book “The Conquest of Mexico” (apparently, a shameless title for a nasty history) said that, “…they eat this as we eat cheese, and it has rather a salty taste.”  It was the Aztecs main protein source, actually.

Based on my research, spirulina is safe for children over a year old.  However, be your own researcher and see what you discover.

While I was in India, at an intentional community called Auroville, I remember that spirulina was served in 1/4 cup servings on each of our trays of food in the cafeteria.  We each had a heaping, moist mound of spirulina to eat like the great Aztecs, I suppose.

Oh yes, spirulina is known for contamination.  Be sure to get it from a reliable source.  I get mine from Mountain Rose Herbs.

THEN, there’s powdered gelatin.  I used Great Lakes powdered gelatin which is a kosher, grass-fed beef gelatin.  Packed with easy-to-digest amino acids, powdered gelatin is a nutrient-dense protein source.

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Powdered gelatin nutrition panel

Toss in some ghee, coconut oil, and coconut butter…rich in fat-soluble vitamins…then, you’ve got a great show for your mouth.

Here’s the recipe…

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This is what you want to happen in your food processor; ready to place in the dish

Zoe’s Pistachio Superfood “Fudge”

Line a 7″ x 9″ deep dish with parchment paper.

Toss the following ingredients into a food processor:

1 1/2 cup raw pistachio pieces
1/2 cup hemp hearts
3 tbsp spirulina powder
2 tbsp ghee
3 tbsp coconut oil
1/2 cup coconut butter (packed into the measuring cup)
2 tbsp powdered gelatin
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/4 cup raw honey

Turn the processor on and mix the ingredients for 7-8 minutes or until the pistachios are well broken down and a ball begins to form and roll around the processor.  I normally turn off the processor multiple times to push the ingredients down again and let the processor rest.

Press the “fudge” into the parchment lined dish using a wooden spoon.

Place in fridge to harden for about 3-4 hours.

Cut into chunks and enjoy!

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Pressed into a parchment lined pan ready to put in the fridge to harden

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I store mine in the fridge like this; knife stays in there, ready to cut a chunk off!

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